Oneness Ministry

We are One

What does it mean to be Gay

I have been asking myself this question most of my life. I remember commenting on how the “Gay community” had ruined a good word way back in the 70’s. To me it means being upbeat, happy, and jovial. It doesn’t really have anything to do with sex as far as I am concerned. That word is homosexual. Call it like it is. No sense trying to sugar coat things. Not that being homosexual is a bad thing. Who you love makes no difference to anyone else. Love in any form is a good thing.

I think the word gay got attached to homosexuals because they are often flighty, lighthearted, and jolly. Which to me is quite positive. I enjoy being around joyful people who don’t take life too seriously. Though I am not big on pranks or juvenile behavior. Somehow over the years the word “Gay” turned derogatory. The ego mind has its own agenda and creating more egos is one of them. Homosexuals don’t reproduce, so in the early days this was a big part of it. The more the merrier! (NOT) The other part is “guilty by association”. Fear motivates prejudice and thus the negative label. “They” don’t want to be labeled as “gay” just for being friends, so “they” choose to be enemies. The fact is, human nature is loving, we are social animals and enjoy hugs. Light unassuming contact can be affirming or offensive depending on a person’s point of view. When coming from love, its affirming, and when coming from fear its offensive. We all have the choice, fear or love. To me the acronym F.E.A.R = False Evidence Appearing Real, fits perfectly. Assume the best of others until proven otherwise! Just because someone has a negative experience with a person, does not mean all experiences will be negative. In 99% of our encounters with each other there is no need to even mention or think about sex. The ego would have you believe otherwise.

Being gay means so much more these days and this is both a good and bad thing. I often feel “gay”, though I have been heterosexual all my life, bedsides one adventure to the other side. My friends fall to both sides of the isle, and some are in the middle. I have chosen to not even play the game. My focus these days centers on agape love and non-sexual love. In the Spirit world, Love is all there is, so human/ego designations don’t matter in the end. For the sake of identity, which the ego just loves, I identify as a gay non-sexual male woman. Perhaps this puts me in the middle, I don’t even know, and have not been able to figure it out in 60 years! I doubt I ever will. It doesn’t even matter to me anymore. If you’ve read my eBook, Sex and Sexuality, you’d know sex is a distraction for most of us. A rare few use it as it is intended, as an expression of God’s Love. We are this Love, expressing. A small aspect of it includes sex.

Sequoia Elisabeth

OnenessMinistry.info

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Why Did You Transition?

Transition is a process everyone goes through at one point or another on the ‘Journey of Love’.  Speaking through the perspective of one who has transitioned gender I must question this entire process and I do quite often!  Here are my thoughts on the subject, mostly directed to other Trans* individuals.

Often I hear other Trans* people saying they transitioned to be themselves or to be true to their soul.  While I do believe this is true on the soul level, it is not the reason we transition on the physical level or even the emotional level.  Let’s be honest with each other here, esp. with yourself.  Just admit that you transitioned in an attempt to fit into society.  What you really desire is to “belong”.  There are always those who transitioned for the sex, but that is another story.

This is flawed on several levels.  First off, as a member of the Human Race you belong.  As a soul body you belong and are loved by many other souls, esp. those in your soul group.  Whether those souls are with you on this journey is not important.  Connection exists always, even and esp. after death.  You are never alone.

By our very nature we (trans*persons) are a contradiction to known and accepted norms, but in some way each individual is different.  No body fits in!  So I ask you, “what is the truth here?”, “why did you transition?”  Perhaps it was to make life easier or so you thought.  Here is my reasoning: I am very feminine anyway, so why shouldn’t I just be the feminine male was born as and stop hiding my feelings.  I used to tell myself, feminine men are sexy to other women, we have so much in common and it is easy to relate to one another.  This theory was supported in two marriages which did not fail till it came to sex.  In fact, those around me also supported this perspective, feminine men are attractive… just look at how many female friends gay men have!  OK, so that is all well and good, but I am not attracted to men, but to women.  Does this make me a lesbian?  A male lesbian just flies in the face of reason!

So being honest here, perhaps you are attracted to men, but this being unacceptable in the average hetero world, your feelings have been repressed or you are attracted to females strictly because you are in a male body.  So there you have it, a female brain, male genitalia and thus the confusion!  Do we follow the brain or the body?  This is of course not including the heart which in the end really runs the show.  So no we don’t transition for sex, this is about gender after all.

Incongruency is the real issue for Trans* persons.  The real honest reason we transition is in order to attain a livable level of congruency.   I am not convinced I will ever feel congruent in a human body, but there again that is another story.  Perhaps you feel the same way.  The bottom line is simply in order to relate in a dualistic world you must be one or the other and since you don’t fit where you are, then you must fit as the other!  Wrong!!

Here is another view point using history as our guide.  Diversity, variance, and random order are the very nature of life on earth.  There is no duality, but our society has forced one into existence and when you force things, they break.  Our society is broken in more ways than one.  Can we fix it?  Do we really want to?  It really is not hard you know.  Looking back Native peoples have embrace their Trans* members for the most part as they found their way depending on their inner nature.  Each culture naturally stratifies with each member finding their place based on the greater societal structure.  So where does this put Trans* members of our society (western society)?

What if from a personal perspective you simply accepted things as they are.  If your male yet feminine, then just accept that.  If you feel one way, but are equipped in the opposite then accept this as nature’s choice.  If you are Ok with it, others will be too.  At first you will probably experience resistance but with consistency things will change and you will find congruency with not only yourself but the world at large as well.  Surgery is a tool to make the illusion of this world seem congruent, but if you do not make this shift in your own consciousness all you have done is deepen your ego’s hold on you.  So when you say you are being true to yourself, then be honest and figure out who you are!  I can assure you it is not your ego!

Sequoia Elisabeth 🙂

Unity in Gender Diversity

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Communities in Common

First of all allow me to apologize for leaving this blog unattended for so long.  I recently relocated to a new state and a new life, so please forgive me for being occupied for this past week.  Recently I read an article about communities in common and I would like to share my perspective on this topic.

The article was about Amanda Keating who works at Out & Equal and covered her perspective on what it is to be Straight in a Gay workplace.  This is the opposite of the usual workplace so her perspective was reversed and in the process she gained some very valuable insights into sexual orientation.  On a larger scale she realized that all of our communities are connected in ways she had not comprehended previously. 

“Realizing that I was a minority, I suddenly recognized how my daily actions had enforced gender stereotypes, and therefore I deliberately altered my mannerisms. For the first time, I made the conscious decision not to put a photo of my boyfriend on my desk. I reasoned that, “I don’t need to brag about how much easier my life has been as a straight person,” when in reality I was afraid of being silently judged for not being a member of the dominant community in my workplace. I often referred to my boyfriend as “my roommate” when telling stories about my personal life and didn’t correct co-workers who joked about setting me up with people. In essence, I spent only a few months doing what LGBT employees around the world are forced to do for their entire lives: I denied my whole self at work.” (Amanda Keating, 2010)

If you want to get to know someone, walk a mile in their shoes, or put another way “see through the eyes of your opponent to know the Truth”.  This wisdom is not new and in fact has been in use for many millennia.  So why not apply this wisdom to the work place and allow your perspective to broaden.  This is what is accomplished here.  Our minds are expanded and so are our hearts for to have compassion for another person’s journey you must first understand what they are going through.  It is not possible for you to fully experience their journey but you can understand their perspective.  The compassion you show is a gift not only to them but yourself since we are all connected in Oneness.

“Creating a safe place for your LGBT co-workers to be out does not equate to creating a forum to discuss the taboo subject of sex. It equates to creating a safe place for your co-workers to develop closer relationships with you by including every aspect of their selves. It creates a safe place for everyone to present diverse experiences and points of view. Most importantly, being honest about one’s whole self allows one to shine and excel without fear of judgment….If anything needs to be communicated to the straight community, it is this: take a step back one day and realize how easy it is to be straight, and then start making it just as easy to be gay.” (Amanda Keating, 2010)

🙂 Sequoia Elisabeth

Unity in Gender Diversity

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