Oneness Ministry

We are One

Ten Days Of Gratitude

Make it a Habitude of Gratitude!

Unity in Gender Diversity invites you to enjoy Ten Days of Gratitude by stating one thing you are grateful for each day till Thanksgiving.  This starts on the 18th and runs until Nov. 27th.  Of course every day is a day for gratitude, but for those of us who have not developed this habit, now is a perfect opportunity to do just that!

The secret to powerful gratitudes and prayers is both intention and emotion.  So the object is to feel your gratitudes as deeply as you can, to contemplate their meaning and purpose, and to imagine connecting to Source, (gratitude comes thru you not from you, so we are simply owning it).

Grace and Gratitude are two traits I have been developing all my life and I suspect you have also been developing these muscles maybe without even noticing!  Without Gratitude life simply stops working.  It is the grease that keeps the engine running. Grace is the way in which we do this.  I invite you to test this right now over the next 10 days!  Not only does what you focus on grow, but that which you are grateful for is attracted to you.  “Whatever we are waiting for – peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance – it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart.” Sarah Ban Breathnach

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays because I feel gratitude is so important and because I feel that I am pretty good at it.  The food is not bad either <G>.  The Native American’s taught us one important thing about this holiday so please consider the following.

The food you eat is a gift from Great Spirit (even if you paid for it).  Life is being transformed to a Higher form by us eating it and giving our grace to the animal or plant that is offering it up.  We always thank the animal or plant for giving its life so that we may live.  It is a thought and a feeling that becomes a habit every time you consume something.  “Grace isn’t a little prayer you chant before receiving a meal. It’s a way to live.” Attributed to Jacqueline Winspear.

Thanksgiving is a daily event, not just one day a year!  Of course holidays are about family and friends sharing gratitude for each other as well as all their other gifts.  In this busy world of diverse business and world travel many families no longer live in close proximity so the holidays are an excuse to come together.  As far as gratitude and grace, well these are daily practices which we are reminded of and celebrate at least once a year at Thanksgiving.

To participate in the Ten Days of Gratitude, go to my facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/sequoiaelisabeth  and make your comments on my posts, one each day starting on the 18th.  I will also be posting on my website, or if you prefer just choose one thing you are grateful for each day to meditate on, write it down, and share it!  With practice it becomes a daily habit and leads to a more joyous life.

🙂 Sequoia Elisabeth

Unity in Gender Diversity     Free eBooks click here

ps. Remember that Thanksgiving comes before Christmas for a reason. Gratitude and Grace before Giving and Receiving!

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Thanksgiving Is My Favorite Holiday

“Grace isn’t a little prayer you chant before receiving a meal. It’s a way to live.” Attributed to Jacqueline Winspear.

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday because I feel gratitude is so important and because I feel that I am pretty good at it.  The Native Americans teach several important things about this holiday, so let us look at a few.

The food you eat is a gift from Great Spirit (even if you paid for it).  Life is being converted to a Higher form by us consuming it with grace given to the animal or plant.  We always thank the animal or plant for giving its life so that we may live.  It is a thought and a feeling that becomes a habit every time you consume something, yes, so this goes for all consumables, gas, paper, products, etc.

The Earth (Gaia) is alive!  We need to treat her as such!  Take only what you need and leave each place you visit (including your own home) better than you found it.  This means depositing trash in the proper receptacle, being careful/mindful of the space you occupy and treat it as if it were your own while remembering others who may be using this space, if not now at some time in the future.  The Native Americans call this Seven Generational thinking, meaning your actions should consider the next seven generations who live on that land.

cornucopia-thanksgivingAbundance is everywhere!  Gaia provides for our every need and those who realize this and act with respect and gratitude draw this to them.  This is called Prosperity mindedness.  It comes from deep within you and springs out like a fountain, thus the cornucopia symbol used this time of year.  Have faith you always have what you need.  It may not be what you would prefer or you may desire more, but needs are always met.  The more one practices Prosperity Mindedness, the more one attracts to themselves.  This is done by giving till it hurts as the saying goes.  What you give another, you give yourself!  This is the very meaning of Oneness and if you have been paying attention you completely understand we are all One – One with Gaia, and all her family of animals, plants, and minerals.  Separation is the Grand Illusion… some would call it the Human Game, but that is a whole other story.

I wish to take this opportunity to THANK YOU for reading this blog and supporting Unity in Gender Diversity.  The feeling of gratitude includes grace, joy, wholeness, pleasing, praise, honor, and purity.  Take a minute now and feel it….  Practice/Remember this feeling often!   Know you are Love and we are Home.

🙂 Sequoia Elisabeth

Unity in Gender Diversity     FREE eBooks! Click Here

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The True Story of Thanksgiving

This is the best story of Thanksgiving I have seen so far.  I believe it to be true as best we can know.  Gratitude is the moral of the story, not to be giving anything away we all know the moral, the question is do we practice it daily and not just once a year!

When the Pilgrims crossed the Atlantic Ocean in 1620, they landed on the rocky shores of a territory that was inhabited by the Wampanoag (Wam pa NO ag) Indians. The Wampanoags were part of the Algonkian-speaking peoples, a large group that was part of the Woodland Culture area. These Indians lived in villages along the coast of what is now Massachusetts and Rhode Island. They lived in round- roofed houses called wigwams. These were made of poles covered with flat sheets of elm or birch bark. Wigwams differ in construction from tipis that were used by Indians of the Great Plains.

The Wampanoags moved several times during each year in order to get food. In the spring they would fish in the rivers for salmon and herring. In the planting season they moved to the forest to hunt deer and other animals. After the end of the hunting season people moved inland where there was greater protection from the weather. From December to April they lived on food that they stored during the earlier months.

The basic dress for men was the breech clout, a length of deerskin looped over a belt in back and in front. Women wore deerskin wrap-around skirts. Deerskin leggings and fur capes made from deer, beaver, otter, and bear skins gave protection during the colder seasons, and deerskin moccasins were worn on the feet. Both men and women usually braided their hair and a single feather was often worn in the back of the hair by men. They did not have the large feathered headdresses worn by people in the Plains Culture area.

There were two language groups of Indians in New England at this time. The Iroquois were neighbors to the Algonkian-speaking people. Leaders of the Algonquin and Iroquois people were called “sachems” (SAY chems). Each village had its own sachem and tribal council. Political power flowed upward from the people. Any individual, man or woman, could participate, but among the Algonquins more political power was held by men. Among the Iroquois, however, women held the deciding vote in the final selection of who would represent the group. Both men and women enforced the laws of the village and helped solve problems. The details of their democratic system were so impressive that about 150 years later Benjamin Franklin invited the Iroquois to Albany, New York, to explain their system to a delegation who then developed the “Albany Plan of Union.” This document later served as a model for the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution of the United States.

These Indians of the Eastern Woodlands called the turtle, the deer and the fish their brothers. They respected the forest and everything in it as equals. Whenever a hunter made a kill, he was careful to leave behind some bones or meat as a spiritual offering, to help other animals survive. Not to do so would be considered greedy. The Wampanoags also treated each other with respect. Any visitor to a Wampanoag home was provided with a share of whatever food the family had, even if the supply was low. This same courtesy was extended to the Pilgrims when they met.

We can only guess what the Wampanoags must have thought when they first saw the strange ships of the Pilgrims arriving on their shores. But their custom was to help visitors, and they treated the newcomers with courtesy. It was mainly because of their kindness that the Pilgrims survived at all. The wheat the Pilgrims had brought with them to plant would not grow in the rocky soil. They needed to learn new ways for a new world, and the man who came to help them was called “Tisquantum” (Tis SKWAN tum) or “Squanto” (SKWAN toe).

Squanto was originally from the village of Patuxet (Pa TUK et) and a member of the Pokanokit Wampanoag nation. Patuxet once stood on the exact site where the Pilgrims built Plymouth. In 1605, fifteen years before the Pilgrims came, Squanto went to England with a friendly English explorer named John Weymouth. He had many adventures and learned to speak English. Squanto came back to New England with Captain Weymouth. Later Squanto was captured by a British slaver who raided the village and sold Squanto to the Spanish in the Caribbean Islands. A Spanish Franciscan priest befriended Squanto and helped him to get to Spain and later on a ship to England. Squanto then found Captain Weymouth, who paid his way back to his homeland. In England Squanto met Samoset of the Wabanake (Wab NAH key) Tribe, who had also left his native home with an English explorer. They both returned together to Patuxet in 1620. When they arrived, the village was deserted and there were skeletons everywhere. Everyone in the village had died from an illness the English slavers had left behind. Squanto and Samoset went to stay with a neighboring village of Wampanoags.

One year later, in the spring, Squanto and Samoset were hunting along the beach near Patuxet. They were startled to see people from England in their deserted village. For several days, they stayed nearby observing the newcomers. Finally they decided to approach them. Samoset walked into the village and said “welcome,” Squanto soon joined him. The Pilgrims were very surprised to meet two Indians who spoke English.

The Pilgrims were not in good condition. They were living in dirt-covered shelters, there was a shortage of food, and nearly half of them had died during the winter. They obviously needed help and the two men were a welcome sight. Squanto, who probably knew more English than any other Indian in North America at that time, decided to stay with the Pilgrims for the next few months and teach them how to survive in this new place. He brought them deer meat and beaver skins. He taught them how to cultivate corn and other new vegetables and how to build Indian-style houses. He pointed out poisonous plants and showed how other plants could be used as medicine. He explained how to dig and cook clams, how to get sap from the maple trees, use fish for fertilizer, and dozens of other skills needed for their survival.

By the time fall arrived things were going much better for the Pilgrims, thanks to the help they had received. The corn they planted had grown well. There was enough food to last the winter. They were living comfortably in their Indian-style wigwams and had also managed to build one European-style building out of squared logs. This was their church. They were now in better health, and they knew more about surviving in this new land. The Pilgrims decided to have a thanksgiving feast to celebrate their good fortune. They had observed thanksgiving feasts in November as religious obligations in England for many years before coming to the New World.

The Algonkian tribes held six thanksgiving festivals during the year. The beginning of the Algonkian year was marked by the Maple Dance which gave thanks to the Creator for the maple tree and its syrup. This ceremony occurred when the weather was warm enough for the sap to run in the maple trees, sometimes as early as February. Second was the planting feast, where the seeds were blessed. The strawberry festival was next, celebrating the first fruits of the season. Summer brought the green corn festival to give thanks for the ripening corn. In late fall, the harvest festival gave thanks for the food they had grown. Mid-winter was the last ceremony of the old year. When the Indians sat down to the “first Thanksgiving” with the Pilgrims, it was really the fifth thanksgiving of the year for them!

Captain Miles Standish, the leader of the Pilgrims, invited Squanto, Samoset, Massasoit (the leader of the Wampanoags), and their immediate families to join them for a celebration, but they had no idea how big Indian families could be. As the Thanksgiving feast began, the Pilgrims were overwhelmed at the large turnout of ninety relatives that Squanto and Samoset brought with them. The Pilgrims were not prepared to feed a gathering of people that large for three days. Seeing this, Massasoit gave orders to his men within the first hour of his arrival to go home and get more food. Thus it happened that the Indians supplied the majority of the food: Five deer, many wild turkeys, fish, beans, squash, corn soup, corn bread, and berries. Captain Standish sat at one end of a long table and the Clan Chief Massasoit sat at the other end. For the first time the Wampanoag people were sitting at a table to eat instead of on mats or furs spread on the ground. The Indian women sat together with the Indian men to eat. The Pilgrim women, however, stood quietly behind the table and waited until after their men had eaten, since that was their custom.

For three days the Wampanoags feasted with the Pilgrims. It was a special time of friendship between two very different groups of people. A peace and friendship agreement was made between Massasoit and Miles Standish giving the Pilgrims the clearing in the forest where the old Patuxet village once stood to build their new town of Plymouth.

It would be very good to say that this friendship lasted a long time; but, unfortunately, that was not to be. More English people came to America, and they were not in need of help from the Indians as were the original Pilgrims. Many of the newcomers forgot the help the Indians had given them. Mistrust started to grow and the friendship weakened. The Pilgrims started telling their Indian neighbors that their Indian religion and Indian customs were wrong. The Pilgrims displayed an intolerance toward the Indian religion similar to the intolerance displayed toward the less popular religions in Europe. The relationship deteriorated and within a few years the children of the people who ate together at the first Thanksgiving were killing one another in what came to be called King Phillip’s War.

It is sad to think that this happened, but it is important to understand all of the story and not just the happy part. Today the town of Plymouth Rock has a Thanksgiving ceremony each year in remembrance of the first Thanksgiving. There are still Wampanoag people living in Massachusetts. In 1970, they asked one of them to speak at the ceremony to mark the 350th anniversary of the Pilgrim’s arrival. Here is part of what was said:

“Today is a time of celebrating for you — a time of looking back to the first days of white people in America. But it is not a time of celebrating for me. It is with a heavy heart that I look back upon what happened to my People. When the Pilgrims arrived, we, the Wampanoags, welcomed them with open arms, little knowing that it was the beginning of the end. That before 50 years were to pass, the Wampanoag would no longer be a tribe. That we and other Indians living near the settlers would be killed by their guns or dead from diseases that we caught from them. Let us always remember, the Indian is and was just as human as the white people.

Although our way of life is almost gone, we, the Wampanoags, still walk the lands of Massachusetts. What has happened cannot be changed. But today we work toward a better America, a more Indian America where people and nature once again are important.” (http://www.manataka.org)

🙂 Sequoia Elisabeth

Unity in Gender Diversity     FREE eBooks! Click Here

 

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Thanks Giving

Thank you for staying here by my side over the years!  It has almost been two years since I began Transitions Blog and it seems like much longer (giggle).  As we all know Transition is a process that happens over a long period of time often without us even knowing the change is occurring and then bam something big happens and we realize how far we have actually come!

Grace and Gratitude are two traits I have been developing all my life and I suspect you have also been developing these muscles maybe without even noticing!  Without Gratitude life simply stops working.  It is the grease that keeps the engine running. Grace is the way in which we do this.

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays because I feel gratitude is so important and because I feel that I am pretty good at it.  The food is not bad either (grin).  The Native American’s taught us several important things about this holiday and here they are.

The food you eat is a gift from Great Spirit (even if you paid for it).  Life is being converted to a Higher form by us eating it and giving our grace to the animal or plant that is offering it up.  We always thank the animal or plant for giving its life so that we may live.  It is a thought and a feeling that becomes a habit every time you consume something.  “Grace isn’t a little prayer you chant before receiving a meal. It’s a way to live.” Attributed to Jacqueline Winspear.

Thanksgiving is a daily event, not one day a year!  Of course holidays are about family and friends sharing gratitude for each other as well as all their other gifts.  In this busy world of diverse business and world travel many families no longer live in close proximity so the holidays are an excuse to come together.  As far as gratitude and grace, well these are daily practices which we are reminded of and celebrate once a year on the third Thursday of November.

🙂 Sequoia Elisabeth

Unity in Gender Diversity     Free eBooks click here

ps. Remember that Thanksgiving comes before Christmas for a reason.  Gratitude and Grace before Giving and Receiving!

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Know Who Guides You

This is a continuation from yesterday. 

There are several aspects to this voice we hear in our heads that will tell you if you are listening to God or ego.  Some of the aspects of the ego are that it wants to be heard, so this voice is loud often taking front stage.  The other thing is that our minds never stop, even when we are sleeping, the ego does not sleep!  One reason people do not sleep well is they are listening to their ego.  Learning how to shut down your ego is what Buddhist monks work on all their lives, so do not expect to do this over night.  Once you understand what your ego mind is and how to detect it, making the conscious choice to not listen is much easier.  Resistance is Futile so do not oppose the ego, simply choose not to listen and instead focus on listening to the God Mind. 

The God Mind is quiet, consistent, and loving.  It never asks you to do anything that might harm you.  If it hurts or if pain is involved then God is not speaking.  God only speaks to you in your Highest and Best interest.  God does not yell or demand.  God will answer your questions a million times if necessary and never complain that you do not remember.  Any criticism you may hear is coming from ego mind since God never complains, criticizes, or demeans.  God speaks only inspiring, helpful, and loving thoughts.  Abundance is Gods nature so if you have any thoughts of lack you are listening to ego.  When our lives are given to Holy Spirit, which is the voice for God, Abundance becomes easy and second nature for us because we are allowing this energy to express through us. 

Crisis will occur in your life because this is an ego world, so just accept it and look instead for the gift hidden within the crisis.  Be grateful for all that presents itself to you whether you think you want it or not.  Gratitude has the power to heal and set things back into harmony.  It is time for me to share a prayer with you.  Look at these words as if it was the first time you have ever seen them, how do they apply in your life?

Christian Prayer for Peace

Blessed are the Peacemakers for they shall be known as the Children of God.
But I say to you that hear, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you.
To those who strike you on the cheek offer the other also, and from those who take away your cloak, do not withhold your coat as well.
Give to everyone who begs from you, and of those who take away your goods, do not ask them again.  And as you wish that others would to do you, do so to them. 

Blessings on your Journey of Love  🙂   Sequoia Elisabeth

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